Our Neighbours Are Our Clients.

 

Our staff is known to members of the community, and we have strong relationships with the local medical community including family physicians; ear, nose, and throat physicians; service clubs; Canadian Hearing Society; and Educational Hearing Specialists. We are members of your community.


Diane Webber-Hamilton, Au.D.

Doctor of Audiology

Diane has been a practicing audiologist in Central Ontario for many years and has experience in both private and public practice and in teaching hearing matters at the college level.





Area of Expertise

  • Balance treatment
  • Tinnitus retraining therapy
  • Auditory Processing Disorder (APD)
  • BAHA device fitting

 
Credentials

  • Doctor of Audiology, Arizona State University
  • Masters of Science, University of British Columbia
  • Former professor Georgian College
  • Board member Ontario Association of Speech-Language pathologists and Audiologists
  • Member of Ontario Association of Professional Audiology Clinics
  • CASLPO member

 
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Joseph Phuoc Vu

Hearing Instrument Dispenser

Joseph has many years of experience working in the hearing industry. After a long career working for manufacturers repairing and making hearing aids, Joseph is now applying his knowledge directly to patients who are looking for an experienced troubleshooter.

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Elisa Hernandez

Hearing Instrument Dispenser

Elisa loves to work directly with all our patients to help them achieve better hearing. Friendly and easy to talk to (in English or Spanish), she takes a personal approach to hearing care with everyone she sees.

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We're Here to Help. Ready to get started?

Contact our audiology professionals today to begin.

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Hearing Aid Styles

Learn about the benefits of each hearing aid, and determine the best style to fit your needs.

Balance Testing

Dizziness or loss of balance, sometimes referred to as vertigo, is the second most common complaint that doctors hear.

Auditory Processing Evaluation

This disorder can affect anyone but is estimated to appear in as many as 5 to 7 percent of school-age children.